Writing Faux Pas

We’ve all been tripped up by these Ten Grammar Mistakes That Make You Look Stupid so I thought we’d clear up any insufferable quandaries that might plague you (or is it ‘may’?).

Also, in the comments section below, feel free to add any other grammatical ‘pet peeve’ that should herein be included. Oh, and while you’re at it, why not fess up to the one(s) that getcha all the time. Spelling-wise, I oftentimes get stumped by ‘sheriff’ or ‘terrific’. Do you blanch and sweat bullets at the ‘i’ before ‘e’ thing? Except after ‘c’?

1. ‘Loose’ for ‘lose’

No: I always loose the product key.

Yes: I always lose the product key.

2. ‘It’s’ for ‘its’

No: Download the HTA, along with it’s readme file.

Yes: Download the HTA, along with its readme file.

No: The laptop is overheating and its making that funny noise again.

Yes: The laptop is overheating and it’s making that funny noise again.

3. ‘They’re’ for ‘their’ (or ‘there’)

No: The managers are in they’re weekly planning meeting.

Yes: The managers are in their weekly planning meeting.

No: The techs have to check there cell phones at the door, and their not happy about it.

Yes: The techs have to check their cell phones at the door, and they’re not happy about it.

4. ‘i.e.’ for ‘e.g.’

No: Use an anti-spyware program (i.e., AdAware).

Yes: Use an anti-spyware program (e.g., AdAware).

Note: The term i.e. means “that is”; e.g. means “for example.” And a comma follows both of them.

 

5. ‘Effect’ for ‘affect’

No: The outage shouldn’t effect any users during work hours.

Yes: The outage shouldn’t affect any users during work hours.

Yes: The outage shouldn’t have any effect on users.

Yes: We will effect several changes during the downtime.

Note: Impact is not a verb. Purists, at least, beg you to use affect instead:

No: The outage shouldn’t impact any users during work hours.

Yes: The outage shouldn’t affect any users during work hours.

Yes: The outage should have no impact on users during work hours.

6. ‘You’re’ for ‘your’

No: Remember to defrag you’re machine on a regular basis.

Yes: Remember to defrag your machine on a regular basis.

No: Your right about the changes.

Yes: You’re right about the changes.

7. ‘Different than’ for ‘different from’

No: This setup is different than the one at the main office.

Yes: This setup is different from the one at the main office.

Yes: This setup is better than the one at the main office.

8. ‘Lay’ for ‘lie’

No: I got dizzy and had to lay down.

Yes: I got dizzy and had to lie down.

Yes: Just lay those books over there.

9. ‘Then’ for ‘than’

No: The accounting department had more problems then we did.

Yes: The accounting department had more problems than we did.

Note: Here’s a sub-peeve. When a sentence construction begins with If, you don’t need a then. Then is implicit, so it’s superfluous and wordy:

No: If you can’t get Windows to boot, then you’ll need to call Ted.

Yes: If you can’t get Windows to boot, you’ll need to call Ted.

10. ‘Could of’, ‘would of’ for ‘could have’, ‘would have’

No: I could of installed that app by mistake.

Yes: I could have installed that app by mistake.

No: I would of sent you a meeting notice, but you were out of town.

Yes: I would have sent you a meeting notice, but you were out of town.

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “Writing Faux Pas

  1. KaKa says:

    These are the things my brother loves to correct on papers. I have had to “try” to teach Micah some of these, now that’s hard.

    Like

  2. marie says:

    Pastor, this is one of the reasons I enjoy your blog so much; you NEVER make mistakes!!!! 😛

    It is kinda (kind of) irritating to read others’ blogs where their (there) are sooooo many errors! I make plenty myself, but hardly ever ketch (catch) them until AFTER I’ve posted the comment.

    Thank you for these rules. I will be printing them out and hopefully want (won’t) make these kinds of mistakes again!!!

    Something I was prone to do until recently is use “who’s” instead of “whose”. Uuuuugggggh! 8)

    Like

  3. pasturescott says:

    Hey KaKa and Marie, I forgot to say that number ‘8’ gets me as well…and Marie, one of the reasons I enjoy YOU so much is that you graciously overlook my ‘well-documented’ flaws (and KaKa, you’ve been doing it for over 20 years!)

    Like

  4. don s. says:

    Pastor Scott,

    I’m sitting here with my darling bride in the Amelia Island version of Starbucks (called “The Sweetest Things”), sipping on very bold “New Orleans Chicory” with a “shot in the dark”, perusing my favorite blog by one of my most favorite persons, and it occurs to me …

    … If only Id’a known I could’a – and I s’pose should’a – maybe I would’a!

    I surrender – no more shoulda-coulda-wouldas! Today is the day of deliverance!

    Thus says the Lord, “Preserve justice and do righteousness, For My salvation is about to come And My righteousness to be revealed.” Isa 56.1 Do this, knowing the time, that it is already the hour for you to awaken from sleep; for now salvation is nearer to us than when we believed. Rom 13.11

    Like

  5. marie says:

    Don, what nerve! It’s no fair that you would comment from Amelia Island! Do me a big favor, would ya? Go to the beach and take your shoes off and dig a big hole in the sand with your feet and think of poor little Marie stuck in dreary old Douglasville.
    Hope you two are having a most blessed time!!! 🙂

    Like

  6. Mandy Houk says:

    I’m an English teacher, so I recognize all of these!

    One of my pet peeves: “nauseous” instead of “nauseated.” If something is nauseous, it makes people sick. The difference is similar to the difference between “poisonous” and “poisoned.”

    So … if someone (like me, because I still do it and have to correct myself) says, “I’m nauseous,” they’re telling you that they have the potential to make you sick to your stomach!

    Like

  7. pasturescott says:

    Okay, Mandy, I learned something here…I never heard it explained like that…now I’m nauseous that I have gotten it wrong all these years…

    Another pet peeve of mine: saying ‘jewLEry’ instead of ‘jewELry’.

    Like

  8. pasturescott says:

    Don, you say the kindest things! Like Marie, I am blue-streak jealous! The best I can do to ‘virtually’ experience what you are experiencing is to visit http://www.aipfl.com/ and hear the sound of the waves crashing the shore…wait a minute…what was that?…ah yes, the sound of my friend sipping peppermint coffee from Starbuck’s (or a reasonable facsimile)…NO FAIR! My prayer is: “Lord, Send Me.” 😀

    Hurry home. We miss and love you…

    Like

  9. Chaos-Jamie says:

    Oh, the Jew-le-ry thing is ever so annoying. And while we are discussing pronunciation, let me expound on the annoyance of hearing ex-cetera rather than etcetera. (I knew nauseous and nauseated, but Webster’s allows for both now. Common usage, I guess.)

    Like

  10. marie says:

    O.K., if we’re gonna get down and dirty, I have to mention one that DRIVES ME NUTS!!!!!!!

    It’s NU-CLEAR – NOT NU-CULAR

    Webster’s pronunciation is noo-kle-er So there, Mr. President!!!!

    Like

  11. marie says:

    Thank you, Pastor, for the virtual waves!!! 😀

    Like

  12. pasturescott says:

    Yes, Jamie, and what about ‘real-uh-ter’? Or ‘mis-cheev-i-ous’? Huh? Huh? Thanks for the nauseous investigation…I feel much better now (get it?)

    Marie, I am with you on that one…and, you are very welcome for the waves! Now if they can just send out a breeze or two…

    All: Go to this website for some more pet peeves: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/career/?p=33

    Like

  13. J.Thomas says:

    Well, you busted me on every last one of ’em!

    So that’s why you’re such a good writer,…you write “right”!
    Seriously, you should write a book, bro.

    (see….was that last comma supposed to be there?)

    Like

  14. pasturescott says:

    JT (see? I added an initial–you’ve earned it!), I will have to consult my Funk & Wagnall’s to see about the comma…no, wait,I mean my Baskerville’s English Grammar primmer…

    Tanks for the props, dude! I can wish, can’t I?

    Like

What Do YOU Think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: